The cover to Batman #14 illustrated by Stephanie Hans.

Tom King’s run on Batman so far has been pretty good, although not quite as good as his previous runs on The Vision and Omega Men. His characterization of Batman has been traditionally dark, with a new heartbreaking twist as part of his origin, and the recent “I Am Suicide” storyline showed a Batman who wasn’t in a very good mood and a Catwoman who had been in prison for mass murder. (Batman says she’s lying, Catwoman says she’s not.)

Thankfully, Batman #14, an epilogue to “I Am Suicide” called “Rooftops,” written by Tom King and illustrated by Mitch Gerards, brings back a little more light-hearted fun in a very playful and yet deep examination of the Batman/Catwoman relationship. Batman’s deal with Amanda Waller has come through: since Catwoman helped Batman retrieve the Psycho Pirate from Bane, the death penalty is now off the table for Catwoman’s crimes and she’s going to be moved from Arkham to Blackgate tonight.

But tonight doesn’t work for Catwoman. She wants to do something else tonight. So she asks what Batman does every night.

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Well, it starts off pretty much like you suspect...

..

...with a confrontation with the Clock King. Which goes about as well as you think.

And that’s when you realize something: Batman doesn’t want to stop either. He wants to keep going with Catwoman. Which means that this night is not just going to feature some Bat-villains...it’s going to feature all of them.

Look at this. Look at it. Tom King didn’t just bring back Gorilla Boss, no. He brought back the Condiment King. The only way this page could get better is if it included Egghead and King Tut.

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But Batman and Catwoman weren’t done yet. Oh no, there are more Bat-villains to fight.

I love how the last villain is the Mad Monk, who is technically the first supervillain Batman fought in Detective Comics #31.

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But, of course, Batman and Catwoman saved the best for last.

Hell yeah, Kite Man says. And he is right. Hell yeah.