Yes, Fact Of The Day does that effect on people. Even when it’s several hours late. But better late than never, as my grand –pappy used to say.He also said that moonshine keeps the Martians from stealing your blood. I should probably reconsider the advice he gave me.

Did you know that Mr. Spock was origionally conceived to be part Martian and that DeForest Kelly and Nichelle Nicholas auditioned for the part?

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Note: I am going to try something different today. I am going to put all the sources from Wikipedia in thier own section at the end of the article. I would rather have them together then putting them into the main article and breaking up the flow. But I also want to make it clear i’m showing my work so we can avoid another what i’ve decided to call “Dial M For Misinformation:” incident.

From Wikipedia

Spock, as originally described in Gene Roddenberry’s 1964 pitch for Star Trek, is “probably half Martian, he has a slightly reddish complexion and semi-pointed ears”.[10] Early versions had the character ingest energy through a plate in his stomach. Writer Samuel A. Peeples told Roddenberry these attributes made Spock too alien, and suggested “he should at least be half-human and have the problems of both sides”,[11] believing the human traits made the character more interesting and able to comment on the human condition more believably. Spock’s home planet was changed because Roddenberry thought if the show was a success, humans might actually walk on Mars during the series’ run.[12]

I also found an essay on the website Jacobin about the passing of Leonard Nimoy and the development of the character of Spock.

https://www.jacobinmag.com/2015/03/leonar…

In his 1964 pitch for the show, Roddenberry had initially intended Spock to be half-Martian, but later changed his home world out of fear that part way through the series, if it were successful and had a long run, it was not out of the question that humanity could land on Mars and ruin the believability of the storyline.

Such optimism seems fantastical today. The woefully underfunded and under-engineered private sector Mars One reality show abomination is no rejoinder to this lamentation. MIT researchers predict the contestants — were they actually to survive the six-month journey in a tin can to the red planet, and once the yet-to-be-invented technology to derive drinking water from Martian soil is invented —will die of asphyxiation, starvation, or incineration within sixty-eight days, and, as science journalist Dan Vergano recently noted, George H. W. Bush’s price tag for a manned landing on Mars topped $500 billion in 1989 dollars.

Moving on in Wikipedia…

After DeForest Kelley in 1964 turned down the role,[14]:133,147[15] Roddenberry’s second choice to portray the character was Adam West,[citation needed] who at the time happened to be busy working on the film Robinson Crusoe on Mars (1964), and as a result, turned to Nimoy, already known to him from a guest appearance in his pilot The Lieutenant. Nichelle Nichols was also considered for the role of Spock.[16] After Roddenberry saw Nimoy’s thin face and sharp features, no other actors were considered;[17] he had already stated during The Lieutenant that he planned to someday cast Nimoy as an alien on a science-fiction show. The actor worried about hurting his career by “playing some monster or freak”, but Roddenberry persuaded him that Spock “wouldn’t be just a walking computer who gives the scientific data.”[18] Kelley was cast as Dr. McCoy, the highly emotional human who became Spock’s frequent foil.

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I09 did a story in 2011 about a interview Nichelle Nichols did for the Science Channel documentary Trek nation where she revealed she had read for the part of Spockk.

“They gave me a three-page script to read from that had three characters named Bones, Kirk and somebody called Spock, and they asked me if I would read for the role of Spock. When I looked at this great text, I said to myself, ‘I’ll take any one of these roles,’ but I found the Spock character to be very interesting, and I asked them to tell me what she [Spock] was like.

So there you have it. Another interest what might have been in science fiction history. A cranky southern Vulcan, or perhaps the iconic Vulcan would have been a black woman, long before Tim Russ would around to play Tuvok. And that is I have today. I big you all adieu, and I will see you tomorrow for another Fact Of The Day.

Fact Of The Day is the daily column where RobGronkowski’sPartyBusDriver shares some random tidbit of science fiction, fantasy or horror knowledge. If there is a show or movie you would like to see done, leave a note in the comments below. You can see the full archive of past columns here.


Wikipedia Sources:

#10 The Making of Star Trek by Stephen E. Whitfield and Gene Roddenberry.

#11 Star Trek: “Where No Man Has Gone Before” – A History in Picturesby J.M Dillard.

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#12 (Alexander 1988, pp. 230–231). My best guess is that it is referring to the book Star Trek Creator: The Authorized Biography of Gene Roddenberry by David Alexander, but I have no way to prove that.

#14 is a link for the Google Books version of From Sawdust to Stardust: The Biography of DeForest Kelley, Star Trek’s Dr. McCoy by Terry Lee Rioux. The pages noted are 133 and 147. Page 133 discusses the audition for Spock.

#15: Asherman, Allan (1988). The Star Trek Interview Book. Pocket Books. p. 43. ISBN 0-671-61794-X.

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#16 Lee Speigel (30 November 2011). “Gene Roddenberry’s Son Reveals Unhappy ‘Star Trek’ Family Life”. Huffington Post.

#17 Star Trek Creator: The Authorized Biography of Gene Roddenberry by David Alexander

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#18 Diehl, Digby (1968-08-25). “Girls All Want To Touch The Ears”. The New York Times. p. 173. Retrieved27 February 2015.