My favorite Pakistani-American hero is back for another round! Hi, Kamala! Looks like you've been busy. Ms. Marvel's taken a proactive stance on the robots spotted in Greenville, hench-droids of 'The Inventor'. Kamala's even started patrolling through Jersey City. (Spoilers below.)

Her absences haven't gone unnoticed, and she's forced to have a private sit-down with Sheikh Abdullah. She's dreading it, but Abdullah turns out to be far more sensible than she gave him credit for. Rather than the stodgy, intractable authority figure she knew him to be, her Sheikh is reasonable and supportive— even if she won't tell him precisely what she's up to.

This is the 2nd time we've seen Kamala be as straightforward, proving honesty's a good policy with or without the mask. She came clean with the cops at the Circle Q, admitting she was a fledgling superhero. Here, she confides in Abdullah that she goes out nightly to "help people". Rather than try to stop her— an exercise he knows is futile— the Sheikh suggests she find a teacher qualified to train her. "Do it with the qualities befitting an upright young woman: Courage, strength, honesty, compassion, and self-respect." Damn, Abdullah. You just became my hero.

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Newly encouraged, Kamala races off to Bruno at the Circle Q, to fetch her costume. (The Batcave, it's not.) She guesses that a nutjob like the Inventor might use the sewers as a base of operations. And whattya know, she's right. Theme music, Kamala thinks. I need theme music.

My hat is OFF to G. Willow Wilson, Jacob Wyatt, and Ian Herring. They're building a world for Kamala Khan that suits her boisterous energy and beginner's luck approach to heroics. She's learning from her mistakes, and is growing/shrinking to suit the challenges of the day. Said challenges include an underground lair complete with alligators, which is awesome.

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The Inventor seems a happy slave to the tropes of his profession, as a 3D-rendered hologram is there to greet Ms. Marvel. The chat is live, as he responds to her in kind.

The Inventor, a Cockatiel-headed clone of Thomas Edison, is unlike anything I've ever come across before. His concept alone gets a gold star for creativity. (Tip of the hat to 32_Footsteps for guessing a cockatoo. Close enough in my book.) The not-bird villain has decided that Ms. Marvel is now his nemesis, and wants to see what she's made of. He's eager to pit her against his pet reptiles... or would be, if not for the sudden arrival of Wolverine.

No, really. Frickin' Wolverine shows up, and Ms. Marvel treats the moment with the proper sobriety.

*ahem*

I totally get that Kamala's geeking out, here. That's fine. It may just be me, but she seems to rely a bit heavily on the pop culture speak, this issue. "Such athletic. Very claws. So amaze." I shouldn't complain, though. If I were a teenager with brand new superpowers and I got to team up with Wolverine, I'd be geeking out every bit as much. Probably more.

Anyway. It's worth pointing out that Wolverine, as drawn by Jacob Wyatt, looks a bit... silly. His uniform's not doing him any favors, in some shots he looks downright pot-bellied. Again, I shouldn't complain. The issue features alligators, an underground lair, and the aforementioned cockatiel-headed bad guy. It's great stuff.

Kamala continues to refer to physics when planning her next feat: A twenty foot drop into standing water could break her legs at full size, so she shrinks enough to lessen the impact when she splashes through. It's creative, it's thoughtful, and it's fun to look at. You should be reading this comic.

Wolverine explains his presence in the sewers, he's looking for a runaway from school. (No, not that kind of runaway.) He also confirms that he's currently without a healing factor, which is a) good continuity, and b) prevents him from overshadowing Ms. Marvel in her own comic.

Cue the giant crocodile.

No, really. Ms. Marvel continues to be a fun, engaging read. Kamala's constantly adding to her bag of super-tricks, she's proactive, and she's largely fearless. This issue clips along at a healthy pace, sticking to action with a refreshing heart-to-heart with her Sheikh thrown in. The comic's premise is a superhero with Islamic heritage, so it's nice to see it actually come up in the book, again. I like this comic. I hope you like it, too.

For now, sound off. Let me know what you think of it.