So this article got me thinking about philosophy and my education.

I recently finished an engineering degree.

Of course I was required to take a certain amount of literature, philosophy and social science to go along with the science and technical classes my major required. Those general education courses were generally easy As for me but I can't say I remember much from them.

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For many of them I analyzed the instructor as much as the material. The lit instructor is a feminist? Then the female characters were dominated and oppressed by the male characters in my essays. Collect my A and move on. (Okay, the fact I can write coherent essays may have helped too.)

One of my engineering classes was Ethics in Engineering in which half the lectures were conducted by an engineering professor and the other half by a philosophy professor. So we were relating the ideas of being good and virtuous as defined by Plato, Kant and others to being engineers. I learned more philosophy in that class than in any other. The fact that the philosophy professor was a not unattractive woman didn't hurt.

I get the "to be a well-rounded person" idea behind the general education classes. It just seems there is something lacking in how it actually ends up working.