The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled (5-4, of course) on Hobby Lobby's challenge of the contraception coverage mandate of the Affordable Care Act. To review, the Affordable Care Act includes this mandate because certain types of contraception are medication that are used to treat illnesses as well as a preventive measure against a really, REALLY expensive medical condition (It's pregnancy. I'm talking about pregnancy.).

Hobby Lobby, a craft store that apparently has a religion, believes that some forms of contraception are akin to abortion, which they think is akin to murder. The fact that there is no scientific evidence that any of this is true doesn't matter - what matters is that they believe it. Sincerely. Religiously.

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That was enough for Justice Alito, I guess, since he wrote the majority opinion stating that family-owned employers could file for an exemption, forcing their employees to obtain coverage for birth control medication through other means. I'm not exactly sure how the employees of Hobby Lobby are supposed to be able to do that, however, short of paying for it out of their own pockets (in which case they would still be using the money Hobby Lobby gave them in compensation for their labor). The opinion says that only religious non-profits are able to take advantage of the accommodation included in the Affordable Care Act which would allow employees of those non-profits to access contraception coverage without any employer involvement - Hobby Lobby is obviously not a non-profit employer. And even THAT accommodation is being challenged in other law suits.

I suppose the one bright lining is that Alito expressly stated that other employers that might have objections to vaccinations or blood transfusions would not necessarily be successful if they tried to challenge their responsibility to provide coverage for those items. Which means, yet again, that health care for women and those who were assigned female at birth is just too "political" to be respected.