On paper, the two shows sounded like sisters. A woman with access to strange powers wrestles with villainous forces that feeds on taking away any agency from it/his victims. Even more horrifying, these villains grow whenever more victims come under their sway.

And at the start, it seems that the bad guy holds all the cards. It’s just not even fair for the heroine when the story starts.

But Dollhouse, even though it was helmed by Whedon and Dushku, eventually came off as tone deaf to the issues underlying the premise.

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Which was a shame, since on one level it has been one of the few truly hard scifi shows on television. If you could edit the brain like a word processor, or network it like a PC, what sort of possibilities, both wondrous and terrible, could you accomplish? And what does your consent to a such experimentation even mean when you may never know that you gave it?

Did that tone deafness come from interference by the suits who didn’t want to deal/understand those issues? Was it the very premise that the dolls’ powers came from the violation of their memories and bodies?

On the other hand, if we had to watch Kilgrave keep the upper hand for three months, one hour for each week, would we have the patience to sit through it to the end? To see that bastard get his just desserts (and still wish he could suffer a bit more)?

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For me, I personally couldn’t watch JJ episodes back to back. In fact, I just finished it this week. The show was brutal and honest — and it has my respect.

But I doubt I’ll be up for reruns for long time, if ever. ... Okay, maybe the last five minutes.

Maybe.