A heat wave in Australia caused the deaths of many adult Flying Foxes, some of which were nursing mothers. This left a lot of baby bats as orphans, which has made for quite the task for the Australian Bat Clinic and Wildlife Trauma Center.

Swaddling the bats helps them to feel safe and secure, and giving them nipples to suck on gives them the feeling that they're still attached to their mothers.

After a few months of hand-raising and tender, loving care, the staff at the Bat Clinic will release these little guys into the wild, in the hopes that they will grow up to make little bats of their own. There are 60 species of Flying Foxes, many of which are threatened because of illegal hunting, being persecuted as pests, or environmental factors such as the heat wave that unfortunately took the lives of the parents of these babies.

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In spite of the saying "Blind as a bat" and the "folk wisdom" that causes people to believe that bats don't see well (or at all), these Flying Foxes depend on their keen eyesight and smell to find food. They feed primarily fruit, as well as pollen and nectar.

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Now watch this video and try not to weep over the fact that you'll probably never have a job that involves playing foster mom to baby bats.

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