Well, we're in it now. Let's be clear: every dish Bryan Fuller's used to name his episodes is thematically in tune with something dark. In that regard, Kō No Mono is messed up in the best possible way. Spoilers below!

Kō No Mono is a dish of pickled vegetables. In this case, it could be one of two things: one, the olives (technically fruit) in Mason Verger's martini, pickled with the tears of a tormented child. The second, which is far worse, is the pickled fruit of Margot's loins.

To explain: the massive Verger fortune belongs to its male heir. If Mason dies, Margot is penniless. Margot exploits a loophole, and succeeds in getting pregnant with Will Graham. (He's less than thrilled to learn he was used this way.) She was pregnant, for all of five minutes. Was. And after a deliberate car crash and surgery, Mason has ensured Margot will never bear children again.

Michael Pitt is having the time of his life as Mason Verger. His monstrousness knows no bounds. The books tell us that he's sipped the tears of children in need, but to actually witness it is another matter entirely. It's just too perfect.

Mason's agreed to therapy with Hannibal, giving Lecter plenty of reasons to dislike the man. Verger fills the room with obnoxious pride in himself. He's not earning any points with the good doctor.

Other wheels are turning, this episode. Specifically, the wheels attached to a wheelchair, as a flaming corpse careens down a parking lot ramp. Jeeze, Will. Hannibal shares a "rare, but debauched" dish with Will, a pair of small birds drowned in Armagnac, then roasted, to be consumed in a single bite. Bones and all.

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For a litany of reasons, in-universe and meta-contextual, "Freddie Lounds had to burn." Her roasted corpse is exhumed, then displayed as the goddess Shiva. The treatment of her remains, here, is a grim excision from Red Dragon, updated for Hannibal and gloriously re-incarnated with not one grisly display, but two.

Meanwhile, this episode gives us a too-brief window into Hannibal's true thoughts and feelings. He shares his genuine self, only with Will. They've enjoyed a number of conversations that are frank, bittersweet, and also tragic. To wit, Hannibal actually apologizes for killing Abigail. With only two episodes to go, how much more will he share with Will, and vice versa?

Not everything, that much is clear. Will has maintained his air of 'creepy guy who is probably definitely killing people on the sly' around Dr. Bloom, who at this point is flat-out afraid of him. She goes to Jack Crawford with her concerns, before he reveals one mother of a twist: Freddie Lounds is alive and well. "How was my funeral?"

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More light is shed on Will Graham's plot to capture Hannibal. Lecter's done an immaculate job of covering his tracks. At this point, the only real chance of putting him away, rests in catching him red-handed.

Before we get there, of course, there's one more item on the to-do list: the Butchering of Mason Verger. And that... is gonna be grand.

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