I know there are a few other arachnophiles on here so I thought I'd share. This morning I woke up to this Zoropsis spinimana hanging out on the wall above my snake's habitat. We're having a notable cold snap right now, so I assume it was attracted to the heat. Either that or its eyes are bigger than its stomach.

We had found another one of these a few years back. That one was lurking on top of our butterfly enclosure and initially appeared rather menacing. I was interested to discover that the species was a recent migrant to this area and that the California Academy of Sciences was studying them.

At the time, they were requesting people send them any information about specimens, or the specimens themselves, so that they could track their progression in the area. We sent ours along with some friends who were heading up to museum for a visit. Darrell Ubick, who was in charge of the project, met with them, cataloged the spider and let them take it back home with them. He mentioned that particular spider presented both male and female characteristics, which we thought was a wee bit ironic because their kids had named it Lola. They kept and fed Lola for a couple of months before releasing it out into their yard.

Based upon the information in this video, we determined our visitor today is most likely female.

Advertisement

Evidently the tracking project is now defunct. The museum's website about it isn't even available anymore. The spider's are probably no longer considered such a unique find. Still, we were glad she dropped in to say hello.