I made chilli oil from oh maybe the second hottest chilli in the world (or maybe fourth; it doesn't really matter when it's in your mouth) the Trinidad M. Scorpion and the Habanero.

It took me about a year to really get a few trees going. A lot of mishaps along the way - they like the heat of the tropics, but not so much when it's combined with heat AND rain. A lot of trees died, some bore fruits for a single season and then decided not to anymore. By all accounts, chilli trees itself are very fickle. Out of 20 plants, only 3 matured to bear fruits.

That's me cutting out the seeds from over ripe fruits with my bare hands on Sunday. Its Tuesday now and my fingers are still heaty. Funny thing is, they are heat activated - if I touch a hot object or goes sweaty a little, it tingles. Oh, and I only managed to touch my eyes once. =P

Here's the stuff I made chilli oil with...

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After cooling them down, I poured everything including the fruits into a mason jar. I had complaints the glass pot used was still imparting the spiciness of the chillies into everything else cooked inside...

Best thing I love about these chillies are they are VERY fruity. You can taste that slow heat in the air but they are also very pleasant to behold to the senses. Oh and I sampled them as I made them of course... Resulting in a very sweaty me...

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Thing is, I think by ingesting these I built a tolerance level to other hot stuff. I know local chillies doesn't faze me as fast as it used to be. It has to be these guys. Or until I get my hands on the Guinness certified hottest chilli in the world...

By the way, almost all the stuff I read on the forums are not quite spot on. I had to either rely on nature taking its course (a chilli tree is still a plant that needs water and sun), or relying on observational skills (wilted leaves are a sure indicator that your chilli tree got too much sun...) Some magnesium (from Epsom Salt) and some hair from the barbers (for calcium) seems to work on the trees that are thriving. Those that I just use generic fertilisers on doesn't really thrive. Now, I'm thinking maybe the soil isn't prepared enough, so prepping them with some bokashi first before I plant seedlings.

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Or maybe I should just do like a modern farmer should do and get my soil from the local hardware instead. But then, you don't get the thrill of seeing your plants grow fruits like these...

Anyways, that was my Sunday. Life is good. ;)