So yesterday I went to see the German movie Hannah Arendt. It's the story of the German Jewish philosopher who came up with the concept of Banality of Evil, i.e. that the greatest evils in this world is made not by psychopaths or madmen, but by normal, everyday people blindly following orders. This is the concept that underlines the Milgram experiments, which you have probably heard of. What you may not know is that Arendt got hated big time for daring to say this, especially by Jews who felt she was defending the Nazis and making the Jews guilty of the Holocaust. She's got death threats, public scorn, lost life-long friendship, etc.

This movie is just breathtaking. The actress is wonderful, with a presence and a charisma to rival the likes of Meryl Streep or Helen Mirren. The pacing is great, and is able to alternate seamlessly between tension, philosophical coldness and human warmth.

But what really make this movie special is the climax, which takes the form of one scene where she gives a public speeches (you see clips of it in the trailer.) The end of that speech took my breath away. So, if you ever come across a theater that screens small movies like this, or if you can rent it on Netflix or some other places, by all means do. It's worth every single minute. Be warned - the movie is in both German and English, with a smattering of Hebrew in some place.