This is an interview with a researcher who attended a Flat Earth convention in Birmingham last week. It’s pretty damn interesting and infuriating to read about the attendees mistrust of not just scientists, but anyone who advocates for science that they disbelieve.

This part especially is interesting:

I know your aim in attending the event wasn’t to change the mind of flat Earthers. But if you were to decide that that is what you wanted to do, is there anything you learned at the convention that could inform about the best way of approaching the task?

Flat Earthers many times raised the point with physicists [who were not flat Earthers] that they were using huge measures of time and space. The flat Earthers said they would only believe it if they are able to see it or experience it. They put a lot of stock and a lot of value in what they could see and what they could observe by themselves. They want physical proof.

We have to approach them on a level of joint understanding. When we don’t agree on basic facts, it becomes very hard to find an entry point. The best way would be to show them something that proves the Earth is not flat. Unfortunately, I do not have the money to send each of them to space. But perhaps showing them a rocket launch might be a step in that direction. They were very skeptical of Elon Musk’s recent Falcon Heavy that put a car in space.

And this part:

What about if the physical proof is presented through the eyes of an observer such as an astronaut?

They are very skeptical. If you believe the Earth is flat, then there has to be some sort of conspiracy to keep that information out of public domain. The conspiracy then goes from the government to scientists, who use false data. For them, there is very little outside evidence that is not explicitly linked to people part of the conspiracy.